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Category Archives: organizational behavior

Today’s post is regarding my thoughts on two different articles. The first one talks about the UA pilot, captain Flanagan and his human deeds, a pilot who not only cares about his passengers and their needs, but also provides them with additional on-board services. I think the whole point this story wants to make is that, once we (leaders/managers/employees) change our attitude toward both the people around us and our customers in a positive way, once we try to mingle with people and pay attention to them, once we bring about an “extra care” for our clientele, we are intentionally or unintentionally providing a different ambiance in our workforce which would indeed result in a soar in costumer attraction/satisfaction, therefore casting a different look of the company to people.

I think Captain Flanagan, during his years at the United Airlines, actually created a “heartwarming” brand of his own which had a direct impact on people’s view upon the company’s name. That tells us a lot about the fact that each individual can advertise an awful lot for the company only by redefining certain elements in their behavior, specially in ethical terms.

The second article posted by Sue Shellenbarger in The Wall Street Journal in 2007, discusses the fact that there are -or at least were- two different approaches towards the correlation between a company’s performance and it’s worker’s engagement: Some think “employees at more profitable companies would naturally be happier and more engaged”. The others including Shellenbarger and those who did a thorough research on the same issue believe that “there’s a strong causality between employee engagement and revenue growth”.

I definitely agree with the second thought which is evidence-based. As we all know, there are basic physiological and financial needs that we should provide for our employees in the first place so they can perform. Then, in order for the company to perform better, we should of course provide a better workplace for our staff so they can engage more and increase the performance of the whole system. I strongly support the idea that if you make changes to the pieces of a puzzle, a good change in this case, you will no doubt get a nicer picture in the output.